Infrared radiation (IR) refers to energy in the region of the electromagnetic radiation spectrum at wavelengths longer than those of visible light, but shorter than those of radio waves. Invisible to the human eye, infrared radiation has a very strong thermal energy that penetrates the tissues to a depth of 3-7 centimeters. An increase in temperature as a result of tissue absorption of infrared rays cause reactions of local (hyperthermia, increased vascular permeability) and general nature (intensification of metabolism, thermoregulation, etc.).

Modern biotechnology research have shown that the infrared radiation is of paramount importance in the development of all forms of life on Earth, so that it is called biogenetic beams or rays of life.

Infrared radiation has an analgesic effect, accelerates the healing process of patients with influenza and can serve as a prevention measure against colds. Infrared rays have a therapeutic effect in the treatment of diseases of the musculoskeletal system (anti-inflammatory and analgesic effect on the muscles, joints, ligaments and tendons), provide a deep, safe and warm revitalization to all organs and tissues, improve metabolism and stimulate the endocrine glands, promotes healing and help in the fight against obesity.